Jul 30, 2018
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Nursing Home Industry Caught Gaming the System

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The New York Times had an incredible article titled “‘It’s Almost Like a Ghost Town.” Most Nursing Homes Overstated Staffing for Years”.  Most nursing homes had fewer nurses and caretaking staff than they had reported to the government for years, according to new federal data, bolstering the long-held suspicions of many families that staffing levels were often inadequate.  The article explains how unreliable and inaccurate the staffing numbers provided by nursing homes are because they are self-reported and not checked by regulatory agencies.  It is a disgrace.

The records reveal frequent and significant fluctuations in day-to-day staffing, with particularly large shortfalls on weekends. On the worst staffed days at an average facility, the new data show, on-duty personnel cared for nearly twice as many residents as they did when the staffing roster was fullest.

The data, analyzed by Kaiser Health News, come from daily payroll records Medicare only recently began gathering and publishing from more than 14,000 nursing homes, as required by the Affordable Care Act of 2010. Medicare previously had been rating each facility’s staffing levels based on the homes’ own self-reported and unverified reports, allowing the industry to game the system.

The payroll records provide the strongest evidence that over the last decade, the government’s five-star rating system for nursing homes  exaggerated staffing levels and rarely identified the periods of thin staffing that were common. Medicare is now relying on the new data to evaluate staffing, but the revamped star ratings still mask the erratic levels of people working from day to day.  Of the more than 14,000 nursing homes submitting payroll records, seven in 10 had lower staffing using the new method, with a 12 percent average decrease, the data show. And as numerous studies have found, homes with lower staffing tended to have more abuse, neglect, and health code violations — another crucial measure of quality.

Nearly 1.4 million people are cared for in skilled nursing facilities in the United States. When nursing homes are short of staff, nurses and aides are unable to deliver meals, assist with feeding residents, properly clean residents, transfer residents to the bathroom and respond to alarms and call bells. Essential medical tasks such as offloading and turning and repositioning a patient to avert pressure injuries (bedsores) can be overlooked when workers are overburdened, sometimes leading to avoidable hospitalizations.

Volatility means there are gaps in care,” said David Stevenson, an associate professor of health policy at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tenn. “It’s not like the day-to-day life of nursing home residents and their needs vary substantially on a weekend and a weekday. They need to get dressed, to bathe and to eat every single day.”

In April, the government started using daily payroll reports to calculate average staffing ratings, replacing the old method, which relied on homes to report staffing for the two weeks before an inspection. The homes sometimes anticipated when an inspection would happen and could staff up before it.  The new records show that on at least one day during the last three months of 2017 — the most recent period for which data were available — a quarter of facilities reported no registered nurses at work.

Medicare’s payroll records for the nursing homes showed that there were, on average, 11 percent fewer nurses providing direct care on weekends and 8 percent fewer aides. Staffing levels fluctuated substantially during the week as well, when an aide at a typical home might have to care for as few as nine residents or as many as 14.



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Advocacy · Staffing · Trial themes

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