Jul 9, 2018
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Legislation Affecting Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

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Our series highlighting recent activity by the NYS Legislature (introduced here) continues with a recap of bills passed in 2018 that relate to intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). This synopsis follows previous summaries we have done concerning the pharmaceutical industry (here), hospitals (here), long term care and aging (here), and behavioral health (here).

In a session characterized by intermittent paralysis in the Senate, the Legislature was still able to come together on several key initiatives in the I/DD space. Many of these create additional burdens on the Executive (e.g., requiring the Executive to create identification cards for individuals with I/DD).  Others focus on curtailing Executive authority in the I/DD space (e.g., prohibiting any change of auspice in state-operated individualized residential alternatives or setting a statutory minimum for reinvestment of facility sale proceeds).  In particular, an increasing amount of legislative activity in the I/DD space focuses on the identification of and services for autism spectrum order.

The following bills in the I/DD space currently await action by the Governor:

Identification Cards (A249C by Assemblymember Santabarbara/S2565C by Senator Helming):  This bill would require the Commissioner of the Office for People with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) to develop an identification card denoting that a person has been medically diagnosed with a developmental disability, which can be presented to law enforcement, firefighters and medical services personnel as necessary.  The front of the card would have to indicate that it was issued by OPWDD and include the bearer’s name, address, date of birth, and a specific statement that the bearer has a developmental disability, may have difficulty following directions, and may become physically agitated.  The reverse of the card would have to include, at the bearer’s discretion, a contact name and phone number, and a space for inclusion of additional information.  OPWDD may charge a fee for the card.

Same Gender Transportation (A10708 by Assemblymember Gunther/S8592 by Senator Ortt):  Under a current law adopted in 1927, a female patient receiving services for mental disability who is being transported to or from a facility must be accompanied by another female, unless accompanied by her father, brother, husband or son.  This bill, which was introduced at the request of OPWDD, would amend that law to make it gender-neutral, make it permissive rather than mandatory, and provide that it is conditioned upon applicable staffing limitations and upon request.

Care Demonstration Program (A8990 by Assemblymember Gunther/S7291 by Senator Ortt):  This bill is an agreed-upon chapter amendment (see discussion of chapter amendments in our introductory post here) to Chapter 491 of the Laws of 2017, which was intended to codify OPWDD care demonstration programs originally developed and implemented in 2015, pursuant to which members of the state workforce provide community-based care to individuals with developmental disabilities.  The services provided by such programs include, but are not limited to, community habilitation, in-home respite, pathways to employment, supported employment, and community prevocational services.  The original bill requires OPWDD to monitor the quality and effectiveness of these programs, requires OPWDD to issue a report by December 31, 2020, and expires March 31, 2021.  This bill would eliminate the reporting requirement, make the selection of services provided by those programs permissive rather than mandatory, and change the expiration date to March 31, 2020.

Change of Auspice of State-Operated Individualized Residential Alternatives (A10442 by Assemblymember Gunther/S8200 by Senator Marcellino):  Current law imposes expansive notice requirements on any effort by OPWDD to close or transfer a state-operated individualized residential alternative (IRA), which is a type of community residence that provides room, board and individualized service options.  This bill would prohibit any change of auspice of any IRA currently operated by OPWDD, thus completely preventing OPWDD from outsourcing such IRAs to private entities.

Reinvestment of Sale Proceeds (A10951 by Assemblymember Lentol/S8633 by Senator Ortt):  This bill would require that 85% of the proceeds from the sale of any property that was previously used, operated or maintained by OPWDD be used exclusively to increase funding for state-operated residential or community-based services.

Study on Early Diagnosis and Long-Term Treatment of Autism (A261 by Assemblymember Abinanti/S3895 by Senator Parker):  This bill would require the Commissioner of OPWDD, the Commissioner of the State Education Department, the Commissioner of the Department of Health, the Commissioner of the Office of Children and Family Services, and the Commissioner of the Office of Mental Health to conduct a study to be performed on the future costs to the state for the early diagnosis and long-term treatment of autism spectrum disorder.  The report, along with legislative recommendations, is due to the Governor and the Legislature on or before April 1, 2021.

Autism Outreach to Minorities (A7976 by Assemblymember De La Rosa/S5534-A by Senator Hamilton):  This bill would require the Autism Spectrum Disorders Advisory Board established in 2016 to identify strategies and methods of improving coordination of services associated with autism spectrum disorders for minority group members, including but not limited to African American, Latino and Asian children.

Autism Screening for Children Aged 3 and Under (A9868A by Assemblymember Santabarbara/S8955 by Senator Ortt):  Current law requires the Commissioner of Health to establish best practice protocols for the early screening of children for autism screening disorder, which must incorporate standards and guidelines established by the American Academy of Pediatrics.  This bill would provide that those standards must include developmental screening for children aged 3 and under, and must be updated at least once every two years.

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For additional information on any of the foregoing bills, please do not hesitate to contact Farrell Fritz’s Regulatory & Government Relations Practice Group at 518.313.1450 or [email protected]




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